Statehood Playing Cards

Kentucky Post image Motto: Let us be grateful to God Next

Although most historians believe the standard card deck to be of French origin, our cards have a uniquely American twist. Statehood Playing Cards are more than a standard deck of cards. They can be used to play contemporary cards games, or you can play our uniquely American card games: Whitehouse and Statehood.

Each card is representative of a U.S. state or territory. They are divided evenly into twenty-five states a piece based on the official results of the 2020 presidential election. The 52-card deck is rounded out by adding in Puerto Rico and Washington D.C., the District of Columbia. Then, the cards are divided into Red and Blue suits representing the States won by the republican and democratic candidate, respectively. Red suits are diamonds and hearts. Blue suits are spades and clubs. The value of each card within a suit is based on the State's population and electoral college count.

The end result is that the highest cards in deck, aces, are therefore California, Texas, New York, and Florida.

The lowest cards in the deck, the 2’s, are Alaska, Washington D.C., Wyoming, and Vermont.

There are four U.S. territories that make up the wildcards.

Each card has the States 2-digit abbreviation, State seal, and electoral college count. This design is what makes it possible to play our two distinctly American cards games: Whitehouse and Statehood.

We welcome any other cards games you invent on your own. If you have an idea for a game using Statehood Cards contact us with you ideas. We would love to hear from you.

Enjoy!

How to Play Whitehouse | How to Play Statehood

Statehood Playing Cards are more than a standard deck of cards. With our patent pending deck you can play your favorite contemporary cards games, teach students about the U.S. States, Territories, and the electoral process, or try out our original card games WHITEHOUSE and STATEHOOD. We created this deck with a mission to educate, advocate, and donate for causes promoting more civil discourse.